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History

The Wound that Nearly Killed Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great died at age 32 after falling ill with a high fever following a night of heavy drinking. Twelve days later the legendary general succumbed, leaving behind a vast empire unlike any other before. More than 2,300 years...

How Santorini Was Resettled After the Minoan Eruption

The island of Santorini, also known as Thera, is famous for being inhabited by the Minoans in the Bronze Age. It then erupted in a catastrophic volcanic event which completely wiped out the civilisation there. Yet, today, there are...

The Glorious History of the Ancient Greek City of Antioch

Antioch on the Orontes, an ancient Greek city on the eastern side of the Orontes River, was one of the most glorious of all the Greek cities in the world. Home to hundreds of thousands of people in its golden...

Alexander the Great’s Sister, Thessalonike, and the Mermaid Legend

Alexander the Great's sister, Thessalonike of Macedon, was a remarkable figure. Outliving her half-brother, she would go on to become the queen of Macedon through marriage to one of Alexander's generals, Cassander. During his conquests, Alexander the Great named a...

Ancient Egyptians Viewed Milky Way as Goddess Nut, Says New Study

An astrophysicist with the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation at the University of Portsmouth in the UK, has shed light on how the ancient Egyptians viewed our galaxy - the Milky Way - thousands of years ago. A new study...

The Athens Grande Bretagne Hotel is Entwined With Greek History

The historic Grande Bretagne Hotel was built less than fifty years after Greece won its independence and the modern Greek State was beginning to take form. It was built across the King's Palace and now stands across the Greek Parliament...

Ellis Island: The First Sight of America for Thousands of Greeks

All the Greeks who arrived in the New World on April 11, 1890, had to pass through Ellis Island, which became the designated immigration station for arrivals in New York City after that date. Almost all immigrants to the United...

Bedrock of England’s Economy Formed by Coins Made of Byzantine Silver

A recent chemical analysis has revealed the Byzantine origin of silver coins that stimulated trade and helped bring about the development of new towns. These were used beginning in the seventh century in England. Starting around 660AD, for many decades...

Greece Vs Persia: When the Ancient Empires Destroyed Athens and Persepolis

Around 540 BC, the cities of Ionia (Aegean coast of Asia Minor) had been conquered by Persia and thereafter were ruled by native tyrants nominated by the Persian satrap in Sardis. It was 499 BC when the Greek vassal-tyrant...

The Mysterious Fate of the Colossal Column of Justinian in Constantinople

The mystery of what happened to the ancient column of Justinian in Constantinople, also known as the Colossus of Justinian, still puzzles historians and archaeologists. The colossal bronze statue of the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I was built during Justinian's rule...

The Spartan General Who Defeated the Romans

Xanthippus was a mercenary Spartan general who was hired by Carthage to fight against invading Roman forces in the First Punic War. According to Diodorus of Sicily, an ancient Greek historian of the 1st century BC known for writing the...