GreekReporter.com Greece Greece Announces 53 New Coronavirus Deaths; 469 Intubated

Greece Announces 53 New Coronavirus Deaths; 469 Intubated

Greece Announces 53 New Coronavirus Deaths
Credit: Greek Reporter

Τhe National Public Health Organization of Greece (EODY) announced 342 new certified coronavirus cases in Greece on Sunday, 22 of which were diagnosed following tests at the country’s entrance gates.
The total number of certified coronavirus infections in Greece is now 135,456, including all those who have recovered.
Just over half, or 52.4 percent, of these have been male; 5,343, or 3.9 percent, of the infections are related to a trip abroad and 40,024, or 29.5 percent, are related to an already known case, the official data shows.
Four hundred sixty-nine people, with a median age of 67, are now being intubated across the nation. One hundred fifty of these victims are women.
Over three quarters, or 80.2 percent, of the intubated have an underlying health issue or are over 70 years old.
Additionally, a total of 857 patients have been discharged from Intensive Care Units so far.
Finally, 53 people have succumbed with the virus in the last 24 hours, raising the total number of deaths in Greece to 4,606. Just under half, or 40.6 percent, of the fatalities, were women.
The median age of the dead was 79 and 95.4 percent of them had an underlying health issue or were over 70 years old.


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