GreekReporter.com Greek News Charity Bare-Chested Greek Prime Minister Goes Viral

Bare-Chested Greek Prime Minister Goes Viral

Greek PM Kyriakos Mitsotakis receives second dose of Covid-19 vaccine. The image initially uploaded on his Instagram account @kyriakos_was later deleted. 

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis had no idea that his bare-chested photograph while taking his second vaccine shot against Covid-19 would soon go viral. But it did.

The Greek Prime Minister received the second dose of the Covid-19 vaccine on Monday at  Attikon Hospital in Athens in the presence of the press, who were happy just to be able to record the momentous event and to know that their prime minister would now be protected against the virus.

Little did PM Mitsotakis know, though, that by baring his chest — instead of wearing a T-shirt underneath his dress shirt — would make half of the Greek public look elsewhere instead of his arm when taking a gander at his photo.

The image of the moment of vaccination — which had been intended to show conspiracy theorists that it is indeed safe to be vaccinated — took a completely different turn.

Kyriakos Mitsotakis, the man who made Greece a model country for his exceptional handling of the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, unknowingly became the sex symbol of the day.

By accident, or by design?

The Greek Prime Minister was among the first people in Greece to take the first dose of the vaccine on  December 27 as part of a national effort to show people that it is safe.

At that time, with Mitsotakis wearing a T-shirt underneath his white dress shirt, the vaccination procedure was broadcast live in Greece as a historical moment.

Yet, the second time was the charm, as one might say, with the Greek premier baring his upper torso, giving people a glimpse of the fitness of his trim physique.

London’s paper Evening Standard described the scene: “He slowly unbuttons, maintaining intense eye contact as his soft chest hair and hard pecs come into focus. “I’m ready,” he says, confidently removing his shirt. He leans back and waits…

“No, this is not the beginning of a terribly written Mills & Boon novel, but Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis’ hot Covid vaccine photo opp.”

While most Greeks complain that being quarantined for months led them to eat more than usual, the Prime Minister seems to have wanted to prove that you can stay extraordinarily fit even through these trying times.

One could argue that this is an inappropriate picture for a head of state, but Vladimir Putin would thinks otherwise, judging by his famous photo showing him riding a horse bare chested — in the midst of winter to boot.

Social media straight fire

The picture of a bare-chested Mitsotakis could not pass unnoticed by thousands of social media regulars who commented humorously, while his political opponents snatched the opportunity for sarcasm.

“Mitsotakis is baring a nipple – the season opened, guys! MYKONOOOOOOS!” a Greek woman Tweeted.

“How can he be on television and trips abroad all the time and exercise at the same time? Is he the same person?” a woman commented on Facebook.

“He eats well, he exercises, he goes to nice trips abroad. All with our money,” a man Tweeted on a bitter note.

“OH MY DAAAAAAAMN! Kyriakos  Mitsotakis is HELLA-SEXY! I’m flying to Greece immediately!” wrote an English person on Twitter, obviously forgetting about the travel ban for a moment.

A British woman simply used a famous movie title to describe her reaction upon first seeing the photo on Twitter, saying only: “MAMA MIA.”


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