GreekReporter.com Greek News Two Stunning Natural Heart-Shaped Bays in Greece

Two Stunning Natural Heart-Shaped Bays in Greece

Paleokastritsa, Corfu
Paleokastritsa, Corfu. Credit: Greek Reporter

Home to many unique and beautiful natural sights, Greece is famed internationally for its stunning landscapes on the mainland as well as on its many islands.

Amongst Greece’s many breathtaking islands, deep-blue seas, towering mountains, and verdant forests, are also two exquisite bays which are shaped like hearts.

Both of these naturally-occurring heart-shaped bays feature the country’s famous crystalline blue waters, and are found on the Greek islands.

Heart Bay on Rhodes

The first beautiful heart formation is a bay on the island of Rhodes, located in the Dodecanese archipelago.

Heart Bay in Lindos, Rhodes
Heart Bay in Lindos, Rhodes. Credit: Greek Reporter

The Bay of Agios Pavlos, also called “Heart Bay,” is known by romantics everywhere for its iconic heart shape, formed by stunning rocky hillsides wrapping around Rhodes’ blue-green waters.

Featuring a secluded little beach, the spot is the perfect destination for all those who are in love.

The island of Rhodes is not only beautiful, but it is also steeped in history.

Throughout centuries, spanning from antiquity to the Renaissance, the island was one of the Mediterranean’s most influential and important hubs of trade and culture.

The remnants of Rhodes’ storied history can be seen across the island, but especially in the old town of its major city. The old town features medieval streets, palaces, and walls, giving the illusion that you have traveled through time.

The island, however, is also thoroughly contemporary — with beach bars, nightlife, and resorts being as easily found as historic sites.

Paleokastritsa, Corfu
Paleokastritsa, Corfu. Credit: Greek Reporter

The heart-shaped bay in Paleokastritsa, Corfu

Greece’s second love heart, formed by nature, is found on the island of Corfu.

According to myth, the Bay of Paleopkastrista is where Odysseus first encountered Nausicaa, the beautiful young princess of the island.

The beautiful, heart-shaped bay is certainly an appropriate meeting-place for the pair, as many scholars believe the couple represents one of the earliest depictions of unrequited love in literature.

Odysseus is drawn to the beautiful woman, and she even states that she would like to have a husband like the Greek warrior, yet never expresses any interest in Odysseus himself.

Despite her father’s approval of a potential marriage between the two, they never have a romantic relationship, and Nausicaa is the only woman that Odysseus never tells his wife, Penelope, about when they are finally reunited.

In addition to its Homeric history, the village of Paleokastritsa also features a 13th-century monastery, which now houses a museum.

Located 25 km (15 miles) northwest of the island’s major town, Paleokastritsa one of the best-known sites on cosmopolitan Corfu, due to its history and unparalleled natural beauty.